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Learn How to Copy the Best to Beat the Rest

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Keith Appleton - Expert Author

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Successful companies don’t reinvent the wheel – they just tweak it. Keith Appleton learns how to Sidestep & Twist

Have you ever wondered why customers are willing to queue around the block to get their hands on certain products?

Or why some companies are able to come up with winning ideas on a regular basis, much to the annoyance of their competitors?

In his new book, James Gardner – managing director at Spigit, the world’s largest innovation management software company; former CTO at the UK's Department for Work & Pensions; and head of innovation and investment at Lloyds Banking Group – presents a theory that flies in the face of traditional wisdom.

Gardner argues that winning performance is not dependent upon effective leadership, becoming a market leader, retaining talent, attracting bigger R&D investment or luck.

No; the secret is adopting a ‘Sidestep & Twist’ strategy.

The Sidestep involves taking an existing product or service and moving it into an adjacent market.

When companies add the Twist, a market-specific adjustmen

Successful companies don’t reinvent the wheel – they just tweak it. Keith Appleton learns how to Sidestep & Twist

Have you ever wondered why customers are willing to queue around the block to get their hands on certain products?

Or why some companies are able to come up with winning ideas on a regular basis, much to the annoyance of their competitors?

In his new book, James Gardner – managing director at Spigit, the world’s largest innovation management software company; former CTO at the UK's Department for Work & Pensions; and head of innovation and investment at Lloyds Banking Group – presents a theory that flies in the face of traditional wisdom.

Gardner argues that winning performance is not dependent upon effective leadership, becoming a market leader, retaining talent, attracting bigger R&D investment or luck.

No; the secret is adopting a ‘Sidestep & Twist’ strategy.

The Sidestep involves taking an existing product or service and moving it into an adjacent market.

When companies add the Twist, a market-specific adjustment, the chances of success are enhanced.

An astute and pragmatic competitor copies an idea and incorporates 'sidestep and twist' strategies such as exploiting a more lucrative customer base

Keith Appleton

This suggests an almost Darwinian approach to innovation, product adoption and financial success. 

Thankfully Sidestep & Twist doesn’t just leave the reader to work out how to apply this theory, and Gardner demonstrates it with a number of case studies.

These include Apple's iPad and iPhone, JK Rowling, Google, Facebook and the first Satnav system (which was developed by people driving around the country, describing roads into a Dictaphone).

The key premise is that innovating is rarely as successful as alterating something that already exists, and effective marketing is key.

Sidestep & Twist claims that pure innovation rarely makes money.

Instead, a more astute and pragmatic competitor copies an idea and incorporates Sidestep & Twist strategies such as exploiting a more lucrative customer base, making the customer interface less complex or embedding functions that encourage more users, reaping the spoils from the costly investment in innovation. 

Gardner claims there are usually not enough adopters at the beginning of a genuine breakthrough who are willing to put up with poor performance or high cost, and they tend to wait until multiple alterations have been implemented. 

As the saying goes, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery – and if you can improve on a service or product, success beckons.

t, the chances of success are enhanced.

"An astute and pragmatic competitor copies an idea and incorporates 'sidestep and twist'

strategies such as exploiting a more lucrative customer base"

Keith Appleton

This suggests an almost Darwinian approach to innovation, product adoption and financial success. 

Thankfully Sidestep & Twist doesn’t just leave the reader to work out how to apply this theory, and Gardner demonstrates it with a number of case studies.

These include Apple's iPad and iPhone, JK Rowling, Google, Facebook and the first Satnav system (which was developed by people driving around the country, describing roads into a Dictaphone).

The key premise is that innovating is rarely as successful as alterating something that already exists, and effective marketing is key.

Sidestep & Twist claims that pure innovation rarely makes money.

Instead, a more astute and pragmatic competitor copies an idea and incorporates Sidestep & Twist strategies such as exploiting a more lucrative customer base, making the customer interface less complex or embedding functions that encourage more users, reaping the spoils from the costly investment in innovation. 

Gardner claims there are usually not enough adopters at the beginning of a genuine breakthrough who are willing to put up with poor performance or high cost, and they tend to wait until multiple alterations have been implemented. 

As the saying goes, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery – and if you can improve on a service or product, success beckons.


About the Author

Keith Appleton JP, BA(Hons), N.Dip.M, MInstLM has extensive experience within a managerial and strategic leadership role. This is underpinned by his academic background and membership of the UK Institute of Leadership & Management. Keith can be contacted at KeithAppleton@Hotmail.co.uk and you can follow him on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/WritingRightNow More information on the published sources cited within the articles can be found at www.business-bookshop.co.uk



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Article Published/Sorted/Amended on Scopulus 2012-09-20 09:07:35 in Business Articles

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