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Long-hours without extra pay seen as unfair

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Lawson-West Solicitors - Expert Author

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A poll commissioned by Middlesex University London has shown that top of the list of concerns about what’s fair at work are late working and management pay. 66 per cent of those asked said they felt that working late when necessary without extra pay is unfair, and around half felt that management level staff being paid much higher wages were unfair. Positive discrimination e.g. the use of quotas to employ a set number of women or ethnic minorities was also seen as unfair by 48% on average although this rose to 58% in London.

With regard to final salary pension schemes, only 31% of those involved in the survey felt these were fair.

However, workers showed support for flexible working opportunities for parents, with 74% seeing it as a fair working practice. In addition, a large majority didn’t have a problem with not being able to access social networking sites at work (only 12% said they thought it was unfair).

The YouGov Poll was commissioned to coincide with Middlesex University’s Fairness Conference held at the end of May.


About the Author

Lawson-West specialise in commercial, business and employment law. Our team of dedicated commercial solicitors can help with buying or selling a business, business law and disputes, landlord and tenant issues and commercial property. Our expert employment team can offer practical advice and guidance on all aspects of employment law including redundancy, compromise agreements and dismissal procedures. Visit www.lawson-west.co.uk for more information.

If you’d like more information on your rights in the workplace please contact employment law specialists Vanessa Crookes, Ashley Hunt, Carrie-Ann Randall or Vaishali Thakerar on 0116 212 1000.



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Article Published/Sorted/Amended on Scopulus 2013-06-14 10:08:18 in Employee Articles

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