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Law regarding flexible working hours

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14 April 2011

Law regarding flexible working hours.

Old Law

Under current regulations, flexible working can be requested by the following groups:

i. Parents of children aged up to 17

ii. Parents of disabled children aged under 18

iii. Carers of certain adults

New law

This has increased to all parents of children up to the age of 18 from April 6 2011. it is anticipated that it will affect further 300,000 employees.

The Government in addition to the above has also announced plans to carry out a consultation exercise looking at how to extend the right to request flexible working to all employees.

What does this mean to you

It means an employer who receives a request for a change in an employee's contractual working hours has a statutory duty to consider it seriously and can only say no if there is a clear business reason for doing so. With the removal of the default retirement age (DRA) coming in to force from October, employers can probably expect older workers to make use of both these options to actively plan their retirement.

Current figures estimate that the rules will apply to some 10.5 million employees, of whom around eight million are parents.

Rashidul Islam is a Trainee Solicitor with Lawdit Solicitors and can be contacted by email rashidul.islam@lawdit.co.uk


About the Author

Lawdit Solicitors offer services and advice for litigation, commercial contracts, Intellectual Property and IT legal agreements. We are experts in commercial law with a heavy emphasis on Intellectual Property, Internet and e-commerce law. Lawdit is a member of the International Trademark Association, the Solicitors' Association of Higher Court Advocates and we are the appointed Solicitors to the largest webdesign association in the world, the United Kingdom Website Designers Association.



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Article Published/Sorted/Amended on Scopulus 2011-04-29 21:45:20 in Legal Articles

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